Press "Enter" to skip to content

Posts published in “LinkedIn”

Auto Added by WPeMatico

With $50M in fresh funding, Allbirds will open new stores in the US, UK and Asia

The quintessential venture capitalist’s uniform consists of a pair of designer jeans, a Patagonia fleece vest and $95 wool sneakers. The company behind the shoes, Allbirds, entered the unicorn club this morning with the announcement of a $50 million Series C from late-stage players T. Rowe Price, which led the round, Tiger Global and Fidelity Investments. The 3-year-old startup founded by Joey Zwillinger and Tim Brown has raised $75 million to date, including a $17.5 million Series B last year. It’s backed by Leonardo DiCaprio, Scooter Braun, Maveron, Lerer Hippeau and Elephant, the venture capital firm led by Warby Parker founder Andrew Hunt. The Wall Street Journal is reporting the round values Allbirds at $1.4 billion. The company would not confirm that figure to TechCrunch. Like Warby Parker, San Francisco-based Allbirds began as a direct-to-consumer online retailer but has since expanded to brick-and-mortar, opening stores in San Francisco and New York. It currently ships to locations across the U.S., New Zealand, Australia and Canada. Next week, the company plans to open its first storefront in the U.K. in London’s Covent Garden neighborhood. It will begin shipping throughout the U.K. In 2019. Using its latest investment, Allbirds will double down on its brick-and-mortar business. In addition to the U.K., the company says it will open even more locations in the U.S., as well as open doors in Asia in the coming months. Tiger Global, which has backed Allbirds since its Series B, may be of help. The firm has offices in Hong Kong and Singapore, as well as partners across Asia. Allbirds makes eco-friendly wool shoes for men, women and kids via its kid’s line, aptly named Smallbirds. The shoes are made of sustainable materials, including merino wool, a fabric made from eucalyptus fiber that the company has dubbed “Tree” and “SweetFoam,” a shoe sole made from sugarcane-based, carbon-negative foam rubber. “Climate change is the problem of our generation and the private sector has a responsibility to combat it,” Zwillinger, Allbirds’ chief executive officer, said in a statement. “This injection of capital will help us bring our sustainable products to more people around the globe, demonstrating that comfort, design…

Recent departures hint at turmoil at Quartet Health, a mental health startup backed by GV

Backed with nearly $87 million in venture capital funding from GV, Oak HC/FT and F-Prime Capital, Quartet Health was founded in 2014 by Arun Gupta, Steve Shulman and David Wennberg to improve access to behavioral healthcare. Its mission: “enable every person in our society to thrive by building a collaborative behavioral and physical health ecosystem.” Recent shakeups within the New York-based company’s c-suite and a perusal of its Glassdoor profile suggest Quartet’s culture is not fully in line with its own philosophy.   In the last few weeks, chief product officer Rajesh Midha has left the company and president and chief operating officer David Liu is on his way out, TechCrunch has learned and confirmed with Quartet. Founding chief executive officer Arun Gupta, meanwhile, has stepped into the executive chairman role, relinquishing responsibility of the company’s day-to-day operations to former chief science officer David Wennberg, who’s taken over as CEO. “I’m focusing on our external growth,” Gupta told TechCrunch on Friday. “David has really stepped up as CEO.” Quartet raises $40M Series C to help healthcare providers collaborate on patient care Gupta and Wennberg said Liu’s role was no longer needed because Wennberg had assumed his responsibilities. Liu will formally exit the company at the end of the month. As for its product chief, the pair say Midha had “transitioned out” of the role and that an unnamed internal candidate was tapped to replace him. When asked whether other employees had left in recent weeks,  Wennberg provided the following indeterminate statement: “We are always having people coming in. I don’t think we’ve had any unusual turnover. We’re hiring and people’s roles change and that’s just part of growth.” Quartet, which provides a platform that allows providers to collaborate on treatment plans, currently has 150 employees, according to its executives. In a LinkedIn status update published this week — after TechCrunch’s initial inquiries — Gupta announced his transition to executive chairman: “Still full-time, though focused largely on our opportunity to further evangelize our mission, [I will] drive the change we want to see in this world, and expand our reach … I have tremendous confidence in David’s ability…

Inside the pay-for-post ICO industry

In a world where nothing can be trusted and fake news abounds, ICO and crypto teams are further muddying the waters by trying – and often failing – to pay for posts. While bribes for blogs is nothing new, sadly the current crop of ICO creators and crypto projects are particularly interested in scaling fast and many ICO CEOs are far happier with scammy multi-level marketing tricks than real media relations. The worst part of this spammy, scammy ecosystem is the service providers. A new group of media organizations are appearing where pay-to-post is the norm rather than the rare exception. I’ve been looking at these groups for a while now and recently found a few egregious examples. But first some background. Oh yeah, Mr. Smart Guy? How do I get press? Say you’re trying to publicize a startup. You’ve emailed all the big names in the industry and the emails have gone unanswered. Your product is about to flounder on the market without users and you can’t get any because, in perfect chicken-or-egg fashion, you can’t get funding without users and you can’t get users without funding. So isn’t it a good idea to pay a few dollars for a little press? No. And isn’t most PR just pay-for-post anyway? No. PR people are consummate networkers and are paid to reach out to media on your behalf and their particular set of skills, honed over long careers, are dedicated to breaking down the forcefield between the journalist and the outside world. They are your surrogate hustlers, dedicated to getting you more exposure. A good PR person is worth their weight in gold. They can call up a popular journalist and make a simple pitch: “This cool new thing is happening. Can I put you in touch?” If a journalist’s mission is to afflict the comfortable and comfort the afflicted, a good PR person makes the comfortable look slightly afflicted in order to give the journalist a better story. Also, like velociraptors, they are tenacious and will follow up multiple times on your behalf. A bad PR person, on the…

MasterClass raises $80M after doubling sales last year

MasterClass, the website that brings celebrity-taught classes to the public, like tennis lessons from Serena Williams and photography instruction from Annie Leibovitz, has raised $80 million to expand internationally. The Series D funding, led by IVP, with participation from Javelin Ventures, NEA, Advancit Capital, Atomico and Evolution Media, will also be used to bring more celebrities to MasterClass. The company currently offers 39 classes, with plans to exceed 50 by the end of the year. In the last year, MasterClass has added a writing class with Margaret Atwood, a comedy lesson from Judd Apatow and more. Co-founder and CEO David Rogier told TechCrunch this morning that he hopes to bring Elon Musk, LinkedIn founder Reid Hoffman and J.K. Rowling on board one day. MasterClass’ sales more than doubled from 2016 to 2017 and are on track to do the same this year. That puts the company on pace to match Udacity and Coursera — a pair of edtech heavyweights — in revenue, according to Rogier, who would not disclose MasterClass’ financials but made the comparison. Udacity has said publicly that it increased revenue to $70 million last year, up from $29 million in 2016. Coursera, for its part, is reportedly “within striking distance of $100 million dollars in annual revenue.” Udacity was founded in 2011 and garnered a $1 billion valuation in 2015. Coursera, founded in 2012, was valued at $800 million last year. Three-year-old MasterClass declined to disclose a valuation. To thrust itself ahead of its competitors, MasterClass also recently rolled out a new subscription model that allows customers to pay an annual fee of $180 for access to all MasterClass lessons, which are otherwise $90 each. It’s been a huge success so far, counting for 80 percent of the company’s revenue. On top of that, MasterClass released its first-ever mobile app this April. Before that, all the company’s growth came from desktop. “To our investors, that was a shock and a surprise,” Rogier said. “It’s really rare and amazing that you could drive that amount of growth without being on those platforms.” San Francisco-based MasterClass previously raised $54.5 million…

How to Set Up LinkedIn Ads

After learning all about the different types of LinkedIn Ads, you’ve finally got the approval from your point of contact or your boss to start advertising on LinkedIn! Except you have one small problem … you’re not exactly sure what the ad specifications are and how to set up each of the ad types. Or, you […] The post How to Set Up LinkedIn Ads appeared first on SmallBizClub.

How to Optimize Your LinkedIn Company Page for 2018 and Beyond

In the second of our social media profile optimization series, I’m going to cover the LinkedIn Company Page. Setting up a LinkedIn Company Page will allow you to showcase your business, publish content and attract followers. What’s more, at the time of publication, they are free to set up. Here’s how to get started. Getting Started Before you start you’ll need someone in your organisation to act as an administrator. They will need a LinkedIn profile, plus their email address MUST be the same as your website domain (not a private or personal email addresses). Two-step Set Up Click the “Work icon” (3 x 3 square dots) in the top right corner of your LinkedIn homepage Click “Create a Company Page”. Enter your Company Name and choose a URL. All Company Page URLs will be structured as linkedin.com/company/[YOUR COMPANY NAME]. While the name of your Company Page doesn’t need to be unique, the public URL for your page cannot be the same as one that exists on LinkedIn. LinkedIn members and search engines will use this unique URL to find your page. Five “Must Complete” Elements of a Linkedin Company Page Add your company logo. This is the first thing a user will see of your brand so make it your logo – not a logo of a brand you carry. Optimal sizing is 300 x 300 pixels. Add a background photo. This takes up the entire top of the page from left to right takes up the prime spot just under your logo on your company page. You can use this to promote an event, display your state of the art showroom, or your amazing team of dedicated employees – just don’t leave it blank. Optimal sizing is 646 x 220 pixels. Add your company description. LinkedIn gives you up to 2,000 characters to describe your company. That doesn’t mean that your goal is to use them all. Instead, focus on the first 156 characters as these will appear in the Google preview of your company page.Think of the full description as a digital elevator speech where the first…

11 Unusual LinkedIn Hacks Used by the Pros

Through the years, LinkedIn continues to grow as a platform to generate quality leads for businesses. In fact, 80% of B2B leads come from LinkedIn, and fully 79% of B2B marketers say that Linkedin has been an effective avenue for lead generation. Whatever your business goals are, whether to have wider visibility, to increase product sales, to improve customer service or to grow brand awareness, there is so much to gain by using LinkedIn to promote your products or services. These goals are practically attainable by having a solid LinkedIn marketing plan. So, I reached out to 10 LinkedIn experts, who understand the social media platform by heart, to share with us their best unusual hack to amp up their LinkedIn marketing game. LinkedIn Hacks Keep reading and learn from the 11 LinkedIn marketing unicorns: Michaela Alexis, President of Grade A Digital Website  | Twitter | Linkedin Never share an article. After you’ve published your article, grab the URL and create an update about the piece and explaining who would benefit from reading it. This allows you to give more context, AND, if it’s a great article, it’ll double your chances of viral activity. Brian Dean, Founder Backlinko Website  | Twitter | Linkedin If you want to get lots of engagement on your LinkedIn posts, DON’T write content that only appeals to a tiny group of experts. Instead, post stuff that your mom could comment on. For example, my friend John Doherty had a LinkedIn post that went World War Z Viral (10 million views and 97,000 comments. Insane.). What was it about? The day John decided to become an entrepreneur. Whether or not you’ve started your own business, you can still relate in some way to John’s post. And because so many people could relate, they liked and commented on it in droves. I’ve noticed the same thing: posts that appeal to a mass audience do best. In fact, here are the topics of my 3 of my most successful LinkedIn posts: -Haters and online trolls (164k views) -Popups (97k views) -Flying business class vs. coach (278k views) See? You don’t need to be an expert in ANYTHING to engage with posts about trolls and popups.…

Transcript: The 10 Commandments of Startup Success with Reid Hoffman

When Reid Hoffman — who is rightly called “the Oracle of Silicon Valley” by many tech giants — returned to the podcast, I figured it would be popular, but it exploded. Many of you have asked for the transcript of our conversation, so you can find it below. More accurately, it’s a draft script, so all words from Reid and other CEOs are accurate, but mine were modified substantially in the audio version. I added a lot of stories on the spot (maybe 20 minutes) that are likewise omitted. The new 6-10 questions from me to Reid (e.g. “What book have you have reread the most?”) are not included below, but you can find them here. Enjoy the notes and links! Commandment 1 TIM FERRISS: Expect rejection. But learn from every “No.” As a founder you have to be resilient, you have to learn to weather rejection. It is a universal experience.  And this clip, from the Masters of Scale episode “Beauty of A Bad Idea” brings that to life. It also gives you a taste for the show’s sense of humor. KATHRYN MINSHEW: I had been turned down 148 times. REID HOFFMAN: That’s Kathryn Minshew, co-founder and CEO of The Muse, a career development website that she pitched to investors 148 times—not that she was counting. MINSHEW: There were literally days where I had a “no” over breakfast, and “no” over a 10:30 AM coffee, a “no” over lunch. Disinterest at 2:00 pm, somebody who left a meeting early at 4:00. And then I would go to drinks and feel like I was being laughed out of the room. And when we finally raised our seed round, I went back and counted. It was both painful and gratifying at the same time, looking at all those names, and thinking, “I remember that ‘no,’ I remember that ‘no,’ I remember that ‘no’”—and they sting; every one stings. HOFFMAN: Today, the Muse serves users in the millions. Kathryn raised $16 million last year—and her tale is the origin story of most great startups. So if you’re hearing a chorus of “no”s, you…

Cookies help us deliver our services. By using our services, you agree to our use of cookies. More Info | Close